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/edu/ - Education

Learn, learn, and learn!
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 No.9512

I am making this thread, because I need to learn study habits that actually improve my chance of getting a good grad in university. After having studied quite a lot for my thermodynamics course and feeling very confident that I will pass with a good grade and still fucking up so bad that I now having to worry about my future at university, I hope I can steer things around.
This is not about getting motivation to sit down for studying, but actually putting the knowledge to the paper. I really feel like shit right now, so any help would be greatly appreciated

 No.9517

Is it important to get a good grade, passing is good enough isn't it?

 No.9518

You get better at things that you practice, so practice putting your knowledge to paper. Do every practice problem that you can find. If you can find exams/tests from previous years, they are usually the best, do them as if they were the real thing, with the same time limit, without looking at your notes or cheating otherwise, and then mark them and see how did you do. This can help a ton. But even if you can't find previous exams/tests, do as many practice problems as you can.

 No.9519

>>9512
If you want to get good scores on university testing, you need to find out what professor is making the tests and then look at tests+solutions from the previous years/decades. Basically profiling the testing patterns of that professor. Also the stuff that professors utter verbally during their lectures is more important then what you can find in the study material, because there are considerable economic pressures that make professors shy away from externalizing the pedagogically valuable information onto paper.

If you just optimize for the best possible comprehension of the subject matter, you will not get the best scores. The nature of scoring systems are like puzzle games, and to get the best scores at the game you need to optimize strategy for puzzle solving, which is not the same as being better at understanding physics. There is considerable overlap between understanding physics and getting a good score in physics, but there is divergence as well.

Many students research professors to find out which professor will get them the best scores, some look for professors with the least difficulty or the greatest mental compatibility.

Taking tests is a skill that is distinct from understanding the subject matter. If you do a lot of training tests you will get better scores even if you do not advance your level of comprehension. So if you get the tests from the last 20 years or so, and focus on completing these tests and tailor your studying and learning towards being able to complete those tests, you will likely do better.

Academia is a competition, so your tests scores will also vary based on how well or poorly you do compared to your peers, it's not an objective knowledge measurement. This is after-all a production pipeline for making mental-workers that solve technical problems for employers. And in capitalism they are more interested in relative performance. Physics is a technical field so they are more interested in having the best technology on the market than actually having the best technology that is possible at any given scientific level. Based on that many students try to find established mental workers, that already work in the field they aspire to and try to replicate that same academic parkour.

You might have noticed that a lot of this is about careerism. And academia is impacted by the class interests of labor aristocrats that want to give their children a advantage over the children from proletarian parents. They exercise pressure on universities to design university courses and tests for students that can hire tutors, and usually the system is designed to make some information you need to pass only easily accessible via tutors, who will play along because the tutoring gigs are better than other student side-jobs. You can get around this a little via the test-first learning method i wrote about in previous paragraphs.

>my thermodynamics course

It's worthwhile understanding the intersection with explanations with ideology. For example there has been a shift in how entropy is explained, explanations used to focus more on order and disorder but now there is more focus on energy being defused spatially. IMHO they are trying to downplay the link between thermodynamics and information theory. I don't know why exactly, maybe because high-tech capitalists don't want an awareness of how much physical impact cloud servers have, maybe they want to uphold the idealism that the cloud is ethereal, rather than servers switches and cables, but that is speculation, on my part.

 No.9520

>>9517
I guess it is

 No.9521

>>9519
Damn, very decent post. Has this always been like this? I wonder if real geniuses like Einstein has trouble in university although they understood the subject matter at hand very well.
Or Lenin who was acing the law exam althogether, although he probably knew the university was not about understanding the subject and more about class interests. I find it hard to believe that he is a guy who just sucked it up

 No.9523

>>9521
What is there even to understand about law? It's just memorization.

 No.9524

>>9521
>Has this always been like this?
it was better during the Socdem moderation, the heredity of mental labor seems to go down during that period, but it was worse during the 19 century.
>I wonder if real geniuses like Einstein has trouble in university although they understood the subject matter at hand very well.
it's hard to say objectively because we can't measure intelligence, but there are indications that the most intelligent people in society avoid professions that require very sophisticated mental labor altogether, and choose "boring" work.
>Or Lenin who was acing the law exam althogether, although he probably knew the university was not about understanding the subject and more about class interests. I find it hard to believe that he is a guy who just sucked it up
I can't speak to that, while i did read many of Lenin's works on Marxism, i didn't even know that he studied law, i was more interested in his ideas than his biography.

 No.9525

>>9524
> i didn't even know that he studied law
He studied it, got kicked out because of his marxist leanings, but still was granted to take the bae exam. So he taught it himself went to the exam, got the best grades and practiced law for some time.

 No.9526

>>9523
Nah, its way more than that. The way you write your reports and the logical structure of your arguments, is an entirely different way of thinking for most normal humans. That's why only weirdos studie law

 No.9527

>>9526
t. law student in denial

 No.9528

>>9524
>the most intelligent people in society avoid professions that require very sophisticated mental labor altogether, and choose "boring" work
Interesting. Could you elaborate

 No.9529

>>9528
>Interesting. Could you elaborate
There isn't much to go on except for studies made that involved cognitive aptitude testing. The result: the people that scored unusually high (the top 5 percentile), had really mundane jobs like mailman or office clerk. None of them held positions like a high powered CEO nor did they have much of academic achievements. I wouldn't read to much into it, it's not very scientific, but it indicates that our societal institutions probably are hostile to intelligence and galaxy brained smarty pants avoid them.

 No.9530

>>9529
But didn't you just state that we can't measure intelligence?

 No.9534

File: 1643215304803.pdf (843.06 KB, 208x255, CALNEW~2.PDF)

>>9512
I'm in the same boat as you OP. I literally thought I was at the top of my class and doing well too, until I got back my final grades. Don't worry, we can learn from our mistakes.

This book is from an American college perspective, but I think even if you're not American the fundamentals should still be the same: "How to be a Straight A Student" by Cal Newport

Take some time to reflect on where you could've improved and make a strategy for next semester.

>>9518
It really comes down to this

 No.9538

>>9534
That book looks worth a read. Thanks and yeah I hope I can learn from my mistakes.


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