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"Our hands pass down the skills of the last generation to the next"
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File: 1608526823680.png (296.33 KB, 500x417, cat reading lenin.png)

 No.12421

How much do you guys read a day (time, pages)? What do you consider ideal? Do you devote markedly more time/note-taking to theory/philosophy per page than other non-fiction or they pretty much the same?

Reading for the first time in years, I'm not really sure what I should be aiming for as a baseline, especially since my schedule is pretty open. I'm reading a rather long history book at the moment at the rate of about 20-50 pages a day, yet it takes me hours to get through due to extensive note-taking and writing down words I want to commit to memory. I enjoy it and it seems to pay off, but I can't deny it's almost prohibitively meticulous. There's so much I want to read between now and this time next year that I'll never get to if I keep this pace. Just wanna get a ballpark from you guys.

Also discuss whatever you're reading now, plan to read, other questions you have about reading, note-taking, and so on that isn't fit for /edu/. OP is just a springboard.

 No.12422

>>12421

I dont track pages really. I just spend a good 3-4 hours everyday reading/notetaking/journaling off of whatever nonfiction I’m reading. I’m slow as fuck however so a rough estimate would probably be 30-40 pages in that time. However I do have more spare time then most so it’s not a good benchmark.

If you go to a big library you’ll realize that even if you read your whole life and did nothing else you probably wouldn’t even cover 1% of the books out there. Knowing this it’s important to keep in mind reading is ultimately to develop your own thinking/creativity so you can write your own books/theory later. It also helps put into perspective you should only really read what you like/what is suited to your personality and attitudes. There has to be a certain point you stop reading and start writing instead otherwise you’ll just end up reading your life away. Also if you read uncritically without taking notes/ adding your own thoughts and thought process you wont get much out of it- you’ll only remember vague details.

So nowadays I use books to trigger my own thoughts on topics to jot down really.

 No.12440

I could recommend the doomsday machine by Daniel Ellsberg, man who leaked the pentagon papers.
It covers the history of US nuclear strategy and has plenty of funny anecdotes in it.

 No.12454


 No.12455

>>12454
the guide

first, choose a nonfiction book you’d like to read and set aside an hour or so. I recommend something that feels like reading it would be nice, but which you do not feel a lot of pressure to read.

second, read the title page and scan the preface. at this point, try to set aside your impressions and see what the author thinks the book is actually about. the title and subtitle might actually be a better guide to this than anything you’ve heard about the book.

third, using the table of contents as a guide, take a few chapters (the first, the last, and any which seem particularly vital or pivotal to the book), and sort of x-ray them. read the first and last few paragraphs; read the section titles if it has any, read the first and last paragraph or two of each section. you don’t need to be strict about this, the point is to get a sense of the contents of these chapters and their relationship to the book as a whole.

fourth, examine the remaining chapters in the same manner. any order will be fine. just adjust as necessary if you find you’re losing sight of the whole work or of the parts of the chapter at hand.

again, you should spend no more than an hour on these four steps. you want to get a feel for the contents of the whole, and for the contents of each chapter that comprises the whole. this sounds like a difficult task, but it’s actually fairly straightforward. you just take an hour or so and apply these steps.

when you’re ready, you can now read the book in full. you will have the bones, and much of the meat, in your head already. the book should be far less intimidating, and your comprehension should be far higher. but there’s no reason you need to do this any time soon. hopefully, with some books, you will feel compelled to give a more thorough reading right away. if you don’t, that’s fine and now you know. move on to another book.
an optional step

after the fourth step, there’s one more thing you can do to flesh out this big picture, even and maybe especially if you’re not going to do a close reading now or ever. it’s this: read the whole book from cover to cover in one sitting. don’t pause to look anything up or to contemplate the contents. this isn’t about close reading, it’s about broad reading. give yourself permission to read this way. this step may be more of a time investment, but you can actually kind of merge it with your pre-reading after enough practice.

 No.12471

30-100, sometimes more.


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