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/tech/ - Technology

"Technology reveals the active relation of man to nature" - Karl Marx
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File: 1673702658014.png (1.24 MB, 720x1000, 1664414880458.png)

 No.18172

Is there a reason why a person studying and trying to get into the industry shouldn't learn legacy stuff?

Namely is there a potential for a sort of job specialising in it?

 No.18173

>>18172
niche job. Just get a normal dev job for now, lean the ropes, polish your skills, then see where to take it.

 No.18210

>>18172
legacy tech is for older devs who never updated their skills and instead decided to snowbird on the tech they learned when young. Its not that 22 year old grads learn cobol, its that they retain the same guys who programmed a pdp-11 back in the 70s to stay on and keep consulting to fix all the arcane errors with that one program that the state government is still using since 1977 but is in charge of all payroll for government employees and absolutely must keep working.

The only exception ive seen to this is mainframers, z/os programming and so forth, where I actually have seen new grads hired.

 No.18232

I don't think software that is actively maintained should be considered "legacy". But there is no widely accepted definition of what legacy actually means. For example, there's a popular book called "Working Effectively with Legacy Code" which defines "legacy code" as any piece of code that (try guessing before you read the spoiler) has no tests.

 No.18249

>>18173
Seems like the most common advice and really reflects >>18210
>>18232
Huh til

 No.18251

File: 1674492798367.png (614.1 KB, 800x450, ClipboardImage.png)

im trying to get into electronics and architecture via my own interest in the NES system. using it as a way to educate myself on various programming and electronics topics via a system i have an unending amount of motivation and interest in picking apart and learning. i know its almost 40 years old, i know it uses assembly and the 6502 microprocessor, i know its been obsolete longer than ive been alive. is it a waste of time for me to learn about all these things by understanding the myriad intricacies of this system? does being that obsolete make the knowledge gained too hard/impossible to apply to modern systems and technology?

 No.18266

>>18251
I guess the fundamentals are still there, so imo I'd say it's still worth playing around with and learning how to max it out.


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