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 No.10198

Post and share all of your favorite horror manga and anime. The more bizarre and disturbing the better.

 No.10199


 No.10200

>>10199
Forgot about that board tbh.

 No.10206

Don't got much, sorry
https://archive.ph/Pm552

 No.10207

>>10198
Terra Formars
Ichi The Killer
Ito Junji Kyoufu Manga Collection - Kao Dorobou (I like all but favs include : The face burglar, scarecrows and the hanging ballons.)
Ito Junji Kyoufu Manga Collection - Flesh-Colored Horror (fav : my dear ancestors)
Black Paradox
Mahou Shoujo of the End + Mahou Shoujo Site
(the end is better than site)
DanDaDan
Berserk

 No.10208

>>10207
>Terraformars
Huh!?

 No.10209

>>10208
While it may not be strictly horror, the roach designs have legitimately scared me

 No.10210

File: 1632369476152.png (Spoiler Image, 359.43 KB, 636x583, ClipboardImage.png)

>>10209
Ah, I guess that is scary shit.

 No.10218

>>10210
Why are Japs so good at drawing horrific faces like these? Fuckin' lovers of ero-guro.

 No.10219

>>10218
They saw a lot of them at Nanking and Hiroshima
sorry, a bit of black humor for ya, fitting for the thread

 No.10222

I don't think it was Ito's intention, but I was thinking the other day about Enigma at Amigara Fault being a good metaphor for identity under capitalism.

Forces that regular people don't really understand present what appear to be customized niches which fit only them, and when entered cannot be escaped from, and the process over time twists the individual in horrific ways which are ultimately beyond their control. Inexplicable impulses compel people to enter into these niches, these "holes made for them," by a sort of madness whether they want to or not, regardless of what anyone does to try and stop or dissuade them. Whatever they were before is rendered into a misshapen, grotesque parody by seemingly natural forces, both irresistible and irreversible.

 No.10226

>>10222
Nice post friend. I'll check this story out and keep this in mind.

>>10198
Here are some more OP

Boogiepop Phantom (Anime)
Gantz (Manga)
Dorohedoro
Ajin
I am a hero (personally didn't like but still nasty horror designs)
Hellsing
Dead tube (Horror-esque)
Alice in borderland (Horror-esque)
Another
When they cry (OG anime, not the new one)
Pumpkin Night
As the Gods will (Horror-esque)
Green Worldz (Drags on/Horror-esque)
AOT (Horror-esque)
Kichikujima
Mai-chan no Nichijou
Genocyber

 No.10283

>>10226
>Nice post friend. I'll check this story out and keep this in mind.


Thank you. I'd appreciate hearing what you think about that interpretation. To be honest, it's been a minute since I've read it so I wouldn't be surprised if there were confounding details.

I can't remember who, but I kind of remember a discussion on the horror genre being about subconscious fears about society in which they inhabit, like the slasher genre being about suburban anxieties. I've only read Amigara Fault and the one with the giant shark spider, and the idea of looking at them trying to diagnose what sort of anxieties of capitalism they were expressing seemed interesting.

 No.10308

File: 1632701197842.jpeg (Spoiler Image, 123.54 KB, 800x1226, OxjyPmn.jpeg)

>>10283
Just finished reading. Entertaining story and once again Junji delivers with creepiness, eerie atmosphere and for a lack of a better term dissonant elements. The first man to enter his hole was so creepy, thanks for rec. Now onto an interpretation/in depth discussion

>Thank you. I'd appreciate hearing what you think about that interpretation. To be honest, it's been a minute since I've read it so I wouldn't be surprised if there were confounding details.


I am admittedly a long time lurker on Leftypol. I haven't read much theory, I'm not extremely well informed or read many counter-arguments. Nor have I read much theory on capitalism affects. I come here to read/learn new and interesting things as I've never heard much of capitalism criticism until a few years ago, and have only read a few Marx works (The short communist manifesto, on the Jewish question, bits of Das Kapital), Zizek clips and theory video essays (something about the spectacle) Chomsky videos and random articles. My response won't be extremely well informed or even good perhaps.

I can't respond in full to the original post you made but I kept " Identity under capitalism " in the back of mind while reading and can see clearly where you are coming from. There's about 3 or 4 more panels other than the one I included that mention " being drawn " to their holes the characters bring up and how they either know it's made for them or the feeling was so great they could not resist it. What this reminded me of was the argument on how capitalism robs workers/people of a purpose in life, and why people either strive for hyper individualism (or whatever the actual term is) or struggle to know who they are. I remember an anon talked about how if he didn't like the anime/manga niche he would just be as fixated to sports or something like the majority of regular people are, and for some reason that I can't exactly explain, your comment:

>Forces that regular people don't really understand present what appear to be customized niches which fit only them, and when entered cannot be escaped from, and the process over time twists the individual in horrific ways which are ultimately beyond their control. Inexplicable impulses compel people to enter into these niches, these "holes made for them," by a sort of madness whether they want to or not, regardless of what anyone does to try and stop or dissuade them. Whatever they were before is rendered into a misshapen, grotesque parody by seemingly natural forces, both irresistible and irreversible.


seems very similar, an impulse to a niche.

>I can't remember who, but I kind of remember a discussion on the horror genre being about subconscious fears about society in which they inhabit, like the slasher genre being about suburban anxieties. I've only read Amigara Fault and the one with the giant shark spider, and the idea of looking at them trying to diagnose what sort of anxieties of capitalism they were expressing seemed interesting.


I've actually seen this exact (or similar) argument made before. It's a fascinating take, a quick google search pulls up this site below if you are interesting in reading.

https://archives.evergreen.edu/webpages/curricular/2008-2009/mediaartiststudio_wiki/index-57775.php.html

 No.10315

>>10308
Thank you for your thoughtful response and the link. I don't think you necessarily need to read a whole bunch of theory. I don't think Ito had any criticisms of capitalism or capitalist society in mind when he wrote Amigara, and I'm specifically looking for things that can be construed as reflecting anxieties about capitalist society. I do however think that, being born in 1963, Ito has spent his entire life inundated in modern capitalist society, and his horror stories must necessarily, to a greater or lesser degree, reflect horrifying aspects of living in that society. I think that the link you provided does an excellent job of connecting past themes of horror movies to social concerns that were present at the time.

I just finished reading Enigma again as a refresher. It can be found here for anyone that's interested:

https://imgur.com/a/Wht7z

I also did a quick search on DDG just to see if there was any significance to the name Amigara, which I think there must be since the name of the mountain is specifically mentioned while the place ("H—- Prefecture") is left specifically vague. This turned up the fandom wiki page on it

https://junjiitomanga.fandom.com/wiki/The_Enigma_of_Amigara_Fault

which mentions both that Amigara apparently means "empty shell," and also offers this explanation of the story's symbolism:

<This story's horror factor is based on the psychological aspect of compulsion. As the holes are "made for them", the people feel the irresistible need to enter, despite knowing the result being death. Famous psychologist Sigmund Freud describes this feeling as "death drive", unconscious instincts that seeks to destroy the individual; for instance, having the thought of jumping off a cliff when near one. This feeling is also known as "call of the void".


<The psychological aspect of this story thus drives its horror. Essentially, it is the story's characters killing themselves - something inherent within them causes a deep urge to destroy their own self. As there are no evil forces/enemies presented in this story, it emphasizes the internal psychological factor - that is, it is possible for people to actually have a desire to harm themselves (such in the case of mentally disturbed persons, and those unable to control their instincts and unconscious, similar to all those that enter the holes in the story). As such, the story comes to explores the innate human instincts of curiosity and destruction (which is also present in Ito's other works) which can, invariably, be the end of themselves.


No citation is given, so I have no idea if this is something some first year psychology student just made up or if it's derived from something Ito said. Taking it as is, I don't feel like it's a sufficient answer on its own to the horror aspects of the narrative. There's Owaki's second dream, for instance, set in the ancient past which suggests that these holes were made by people as some sort of punishment or execution. This externalizes the forces at work from an internal compulsion towards self destruction to outside social forces which apparently apply universally to men and women, and children as well as adults.

There's also the differences in response among the individuals. Yoshida is terrified once she finds her hole, while Nakagaki is pretty cavalier about entering his. There's another young man that seems pretty frantic about entering his hole. You have scientists there to study the holes, as well as rescue crews which attempt to recover people that have entered the holes. It's also stated that those that enter holes not made for them can only go so far in before they're stopped–so the holes are both custom made, and exert a force of their own which not only attracts people to them, but draws them deeper into it once they enter.

So if the "death drive" is a factor, I think it's a secondary one. More significant I think is that the holes people enter into appear tailor made, and their purpose and use are socially derived. The attraction starts when people see "their" shape in the fault on TV, even though there's no way it could possibly have been made for them, specifically. Whether or not it results in their actual death is unclear. In his nightmare, Owaki describes being stretched by the distortions in the silhouette and is alive beyond the point that a person reasonably could be–and the ending suggests that the individual survives the experience but it twisted beyond any recognition of what they were.

The forces at work then aren't the internal Freudian "death drive" but external social forces which individually people are unable to resist. People created the holes as a prescriptive process to reshape other people in their society, which cannot be escaped once engaged with, and which leave the individual a twisted distortion of their original self once they emerge, and which effects everyone in the world.

Capitalist society uses identity in a similar way, whether it's national identity, gender, sexuality, ethnic, hobby, whatever. "Demographics" are human-shaped niches which aren't actually made to fit every individual, but in which individuals are made to fit, distorting them. Even when engaged with by choice, under the belief that the niche is "yours" which you "fit perfectly" like with Nakagaki, the realization that it doesn't in fact fit perfectly comes only at the point that no escape is possible, that you're "stuck," and at the mercy of forces irresistible and merciless.

Sure, the idea of a spooky hole you can't escape is pretty scary, but I think that's the real root of the horror people feel and which makes the story so famous. It's an experience universal to capitalism known to everyone with an internet connection, of being forced by these inexplicable social forces bearing relentlessly down on people and reshaping them into something no one would recognize as human.

 No.10330

File: 1632714377601.jpg (Spoiler Image, 181.57 KB, 2048x2048, fxta5rx7h1s41.jpg)

>>10315
Amazing effortpost friend, I believe that breakdown on the stories symbolism reads more like a fan who decided to give an in depth reading into the story, I doubt Ito would comment on it like that, especially since it's at the end of another story.

I'd love to see your thoughts and insights on other works of horror (or manga in general), being it manga or other mediums. You've sparked a greater interest I once had in the meaning behind the genre and write clearly. Hope to see more similar posts on other topics.

>>10198
Can't believe I forgot to mention one of my original favorites, Detective Conan. The black shadow, a character whom is usually the villain appears as a silhouette until revealed use to give me nightmares and I always felt like I was being watched at night. It's also probably the best usage of " who is this mysterious person " I've seen in mediums as you can never tell who it because the shadow has the same face and body shape even if the person is revealed to be fat or disfigured.

The first 100-300 episodes of early Conan had a great sub horror feel. The Villa arc, The museum murder and early editions of the black organizations felt visceral and real. Combined with the darker aesthetics of 90s / early 2000s anime and the early art and sound design of the show, it's very enjoyable. I miss it.

 No.10335

>>10330
>Amazing effortpost friend, I believe that breakdown on the stories symbolism reads more like a fan who decided to give an in depth reading into the story, I doubt Ito would comment on it like that, especially since it's at the end of another story.

>I'd love to see your thoughts and insights on other works of horror (or manga in general), being it manga or other mediums. You've sparked a greater interest I once had in the meaning behind the genre and write clearly. Hope to see more similar posts on other topics.


Thank you very much for the kind words. If I get the chance I'll take a look at some of Ito's other works and see what else I might come up with.

 No.10535

check this article out, it focuses on horror instead of anime but I think the same dynamics are at work here. TL;DR, anime-bashers are moralistic Anglo chauvinists.

https://geotrickster.com/2020/07/02/woke-xenophobia-and-the-left-liberal-cromwellians/

>One of the reasons I suspect this is so xenophobic is because among the bien pensant posers who make up the followers-of-the-elite classes there are constant demands for ‘representation’ from fictional genres that are plenty diverse…but not necessarily in the English language. Film is global yet people who only watch Hollywood blockbusters and British twee-comedy are angry that they don’t see enough of the world reflected in that. This is because they are assuming that English language culture *is* world culture and are too lazy and nativistic to seek out and watch foreign films from across the planet. Something it is easier to do now than ever before.


>Marlon James (and others less noticed by the mainstream) pull from real history and mythology to tell unique fantasy stories from across space and time. Currently, China is producing tons of new and vibrant science fiction. Horror writers from the Middle East and Africa are making waves and Japan has been plugging along since Edogawa Rampo. But if it makes McSkaleighlough Connecticut-Kaleton uncomfortable by breaking Anglofied expectations than it must be of the devil. What these people really want is simple good vs evil narratives, Lord of the Rings in blackface. The Christian narrative secularized into liberal gruel. An affirmation of norms highly specific in time and place but assumed to be desirable to the entire world. After all, without these norms wokeness would be impossible.

 No.10579

10 Horror anime https://archive.ph/RWSkY

 No.11153

File: 1635646825536.png (519.27 KB, 421x600, ClipboardImage.png)

Mieruko-chan is a good horror comedy and High School of the Dead is pretty fucked up too (but both keep going from utter horror to fanservice).

 No.11184

File: 1635783771489.png (1.75 MB, 1021x703, ClipboardImage.png)

Shōjo Tsubaki from the 90s. I haven't watched it, but it's said to be one of the most disturbing anime of all time.

 No.11194

>>11184
uhh what happened to the original thread this was posted in

 No.11301

>>11194
It's still there, but dead and pointless

 No.15235

Does anyone remember this horror manga about a city that had underground eldritch creatures start coming out onto the surface and it follows a group of survivors?


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