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/edu/ - Education

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 No.10691

Don't ask how, but now I'm responsible for a club of high-schoolers that are self-described "baby leftists" and want to learn more. As far as I'm aware, they don't seem to be as lib-brained as I expected(though they certainly still are to some extent), so I really don't want to mess this up.

Apart from the classic reading lists of /leftypol/, what are some other accessible texts(history especially, because some of the AP history and english teachers here are quite anti-communist even by lib standards and their curriculums reflect that) that I could give them and expect them to get through?

 No.10694

>>10691
Others more autistic will probably be able to dump books at you. I wont do that. But I do have advice.

I'd start by asking them which shit they're interested in reading about, be it history, philosophy, theory, and what kind of stuff, e.g. about imperialism, or class, or what. This is somewhat important, because you can get a feel for what's accessible based on what background they have and where they feel they want to add to. Try to challenge them ofc, but there's some stuff that's theoretically advanced and really good, but maybe boring, and some stuff that's more fun and easy reading but won't necessarily give them all the necessary tools to come to a materialist, dialectical view of the world. So it's kind of a trade-off of how theoretically sharp and unified you care to be, and how much background you have to give first. To me though even just talking this through narrows it down for me because really everyone needs context in order to understand the theory.

I can tell you that some pop-marxist works like White Trash by Isenberg are pretty good for baby-leftists, just in developing a class focus and a more thorough understanding of history. I'd also focus on books that get into the "hidden history", i know Zinn's People's History was one that made a friend of mine a life-long leftist, and I like William Blum's books on the CIA and american imperialism. I'd not touch on whatever hot marxists honestly, or marx himself, unless people are really wanting that. I wouldn't touch meme shit with a pole either like D&G, afro-pessimism, or settlers.

Honestly the more i write the more I'm certain: Focus on getting them history mixed with good class analysis. That's literally it. Vet the books first, make sure they're not some weird frankfurt ivory tower shit. That's it. Because people are gonna go off and take their own path eventually, learning for themselves. And there's a million pamphlets, programs, economics books, critiques + refutations, and philosophical tomes, but most importantly is a deep history of the world and class society. There's really nothing bad to read, but if they go down some anarchist or wokoid tangent early then they'll waste a lot of time on a sort of pseudo-radicalism, and might just get tired of it and think there's no way forward and give up. But honestly it's not that high stakes, people can read weird shit, go down rabbitholes, and will definitely emerge on the other side enriched. But once we get jobs and shit our ability to learn takes a nosedive since there's so much less free time, especially if you want to hang out with friends too.

Also don't shy away from Lenin and Stalin. They wrote shit in pretty accessible ways. Lenin's "Karl Marx" is really good, maybe even start off with that because it's a really solid foundation. But really just focus on giving them history, like deep and broad history if possible, and with a class analysis or at least a anti-imperialist angle.

 No.10696

If you want them to get into Marxism, in this order have them read
Engels - Ludwig Feuerbach and the End of Classical German Philosophy
Engels - Principles of Communism
Marx - Critique of the Gotha Programme
Marx - Wage Labor and Capital
Marx - Value Price and Profit
M&E - The Manifesto
That's a good beginner list of short texts to get some core concepts understood, finishing with something mainstream that should motivate them.

 No.10697

Without a doubt the very first things I'd suggest are Michael Parenti. I'd also as Anon1 stated, keep away from heavy communist theory and stuff, it's something for later, as they're not going to be interested or understand it initially.
A very good thing to aim for is to let them learn about the horrific crimes of the CIA (see the CIA thread here on /edu/) and let them realize just how much the cries of anti-communism and US Democracy are a facade for global domination. Also if they seek specific examples of leftism Cuba is a good thing to go over. See the leftypedia article on Cuba and explain to them the resilience of Cuba and its socio-economic system despite all odds.
I'd also go into WW2 and debunk common myths about the Eastern front like human waves, "le Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact" and most importantly the support of Nazis by the West up til 1942, the rescue of many top officers of Nazi Germany and their placement as heads of NATO, And the "Rape of Berlin" (see https://www.quora.com/Was-the-rape-of-Nazi-Germany-by-the-Red-Army-really-extensive/answer/Chuck-Garen for the last one)
https://leftypedia.org/wiki/NATO
https://leftypedia.org/wiki/List_of_atrocities_committed_by_the_United_States
https://leftypedia.org/wiki/Republic_of_Cuba

I also suggest the Debunk thread for some basic debunks of common myths about everything from the 15$ wage criticism to the conditions of North Korea.

 No.10698

>>10697
Echoing this, all good advice.
I'll recommend reading shorter articles, by, for example, Parenti.

Also videos. Documentaries. Adam Curtis has compelling docs.

In general, keep it short but spicy. Investigate what areas people are liking more or want to know more.

 No.10704

Just print and hand them the most dank leftypol maymays and they will have understood material dialectics.

 No.10713

who cares
if they're smart they'll figure out marxists.org and libgen exist and find out for themselves

 No.10716

I would recommend you weave memoir/narrative style books in between "raw" theory. So say you want to talk about empire and colonialism etc, you could start with Wretched of the Earth, move to Jakarta Method, then either have them all read All the Shah's men or ask them to select a country and a book associated with it (insert here if anyone can make a list of such books) to lead discussion. Be sure to fill in knowledge or analysis if they need a hand

 No.11045

Just wanted to fill in the board on more things since the suggestions have been pretty good:

* History has gone well, not even just Killing Hope and the like, using things like the documents on CIA-Sponsored coups(they stock some of the Latin America Readers here) have also been highly educational.
* One of the kids asked me if they should join the IYSSE, and I didn't know what to tell them, because on one hand they're actually taking initiative and joining an org, on the other hand it might be bad op-sec for them. What do you think, anons?
* So far, the biggest non-demsoc parties near me seem to be the PSL, PLP, and whatever WSWS people are(there were people handing out WSWS articles just outside the school after school hours). Which of these(if any) do you think are worth their time?

 No.11046

I read these two books years ago. They're very basic, babby introductions to leftism and philosophy/marxism for people who are clueless; they're even illustrated. These are the most basic texts I can think of.

 No.11047

I'd say start even "softer" with works like attached.
Also don't just give them texts, memes, or YouTubers (SecondThought is a nice easy watch), that say how shit things are.
Also give them stuff about what they can do as individuals day-to-day, then as a group, and then organising, etc.

No point making them feel powerless.

 No.11048

>>11045
>* History has gone well, not even just Killing Hope and the like, using things like the documents on CIA-Sponsored coups(they stock some of the Latin America Readers here) have also been highly educational.
Don't forget the classic, when they're ready, Open Veins of South America. But at that point they'd also be read for Black Shirts and Reds.
Also for you OP I'd recommend Pedagogy of the Oppressed and The Ignorant School Master to help you on your tutoring/education facilitation ways.
>* One of the kids asked me if they should join the IYSSE, and I didn't know what to tell them, because on one hand they're actually taking initiative and joining an org, on the other hand it might be bad op-sec for them. What do you think, anons?
>* So far, the biggest non-demsoc parties near me seem to be the PSL, PLP, and whatever WSWS people are(there were people handing out WSWS articles just outside the school after school hours). Which of these(if any) do you think are worth their time?
I think it's a teachable moment. Get them to do some reasearch on each group, even just a Wikiglow search (but start with the official sites of the orgs). Compare them, and let them decide which they'd be interested in joining up with BUT advise they don't jump in too much too soon…

 No.11049

>>11047
Just realised three of my suggested texts might be a bit too heavy :\

 No.11065

>>10691
History is one of the most powerful types of texts you can give to people who are new to leftism. By that I don't necessarily mean pushing Howard Zinn (though that can be a good idea, depending on the context), but simply finding a good marxist text about a time period the high-schoolers you're taking care of might be interested. Like, finding out about how nightmarish the formation of capitalism was can be just as powerful as reading Marx. So Parenti (for more recent stuff like Yugoslavia), Thompson, etc. can be great introductions without being too difficult to read.

 No.11066

>>11049
I like Byung-Chul Han, but he does go on some Hegelian and Heideggerian tangents that are nigh impenetrable if you're not already acquainted with the stuff (and even then…). Graeber is fine though, but maybe some of his other works might be more interesting?

 No.11072

>>11066
This is a fun one.


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