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"Technology reveals the active relation of man to nature"
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File: 1624038678945.png (17.74 KB, 579x382, 34567899876.png)

 No.9418[Reply]

Hello, tech, I'm looking to develop a leftypol textboard for the gemini protocol. I am curious about where I should get started, or, what language would be optimal for this. I also don't really understand how to get one language to interact with another language. (Gem text and Perl for example) I don't really want to do anything huge or something that will blow up I am just a hobbyist looking to do something fun and interesting. thoughts?
3 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9430

>>9429
>is just one giant wall of topics and replies
You want to make a textboard and you don't even know what they are?
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 No.9431

>>9430
A text board is not, or, does not have to be that.

A text board can still be structured like a typical chan. There's no rules saying I mus have one giant endlessly scrolling wall of text. That's pants on head retarded.
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 No.9432

>>9431
Ok maybe I'M the retard, you want to make a textboard in the vein of 2ch then?
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 No.9433

Extend this with gemini support
https://gitlab.com/naughtybits/schemebbs
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 No.9434

>>9433
Based.

Here's another textboard script that tries to remain as close as possible to 2channel but with a database and QoL features.
https://git.bienvenidoainternet.org/bai/weabot/


File: 1623914259481.png (356.28 KB, 800x949, 776930cf38ba5ed8e9c2b6f7a1….png)

 No.9326[Reply]

Why hasn't chans/imageboards UX/UI advanced beyond the early to mid 2000s?

Would anons even want a "modern" style HTML5/CSS UI with flex/grid/etc. ?

I feel like having a non dated UI would attract alot more normies to imageboards
9 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9389

>>9386
does the onion router even care about protocols ? It might take some configuring but in principle any type of package based information transfer should be compatible.
>>9388
>Do gemini browsers support images?
if you want inline images displayed along side the text, use the Lagrange browser.
But try out amfora as well, it's very nice, it opens images in an external application
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 No.9392

>>9389
>does the onion router even care about protocols ?
Only at layer 3. Tor only supports TCP.
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 No.9424

>>9326
How exactly do you envision it to be more "modern"? It's a text board with pictures. What else does it need? You can look at russian 2ch.hk to see a bit more modern take (which I think is pure cringe). There was also that one project Moot started that was supposed to be "like if 4chan was created today" back in 2010 and it failed. There's no need for major innovation here.
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 No.9425

>>9424
Reactions 😤
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 No.9426

>>9326
UX/UI design has been in freefall since the introduction of smartphones and tablets. imageboards are one of the few sets of website types still marginally tolerable to use.

whenever someone says the word "responsive" i want to break his fingers.


File: 1623980542452.png (1.37 MB, 900x900, ClipboardImage.png)

 No.9372[Reply]

how do you glowproof your PC? Do I need to learn how to set up Gentoo? I feel like I'm being watched every second by glowuyghurs, winglows 10 and hackers. They're mining all my data. They're watching me. How do I stop that? I also feel like if I wanted to transfer my files to another computer they would just embed their viruses into my files and infect the next computer. How do you stop it?
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 No.9373

>>9372
Install OpenBSD, stop using Google services.

But for real? They aren't really looking at YOU individually, so just try to evade Google produtcs (google.com, gmail, google calendar…) and you'll be fine
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 No.9374

>>9373
They are looking at me individually, they do watch me. I know.
AND it's hard not to use google when it's the only way I can extract certain infos. Such as, it's hard for me to extract info. There's commands you can do on google like direct quotations (say I want to search for "beanie babies" in quotes and not beanie babies without, it gives different results… or a certain timeline "2008..2010" for instance…), these features don't appear on Startpage or DuckDuckGo (the latter of which I distrust anyway). Is it available on Searx?
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 No.9375

>>9374
I think Searx should work like google

If you don't trust them use Tor to browse google then
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 No.9376

>>9375
I may try Googling through Tor if Searx doesn't work… although that might work slower.
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 No.9408

another schizo here with a simple question, would it be a safer bet to get a core/librebooted thinkpad with me_cleaner or a pre-PSP amd cpu? i dont plan on doing anything resource intensive


File: 1623984843064.png (48.84 KB, 756x556, 1623949259720.png)

 No.9378[Reply]

While I really don't care about Rust it's weird to see corporations have so much power over Linux.
2 posts omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9381

>>9380
Any Nordic European who willingly moves to the USA has some sort of major corporate/intelligence backing.
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 No.9387

Why would Rust attract new developers? C is much easier than Rust.
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 No.9396

>>9387
Rust has a very politically-inclined community full of wokies who are susceptible to trendy politics and zeitgeist, which as we have seen, corps exploit regularly.

Its development and future is also heavily influenced by Mozilla, and the compiler is free of FSF ideology, unlike GCC.

I actually really like Rust, from a technical standpoint, but there is no doubt that it is far more prone to corporate and political influence compared to C.
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 No.9397

>>9387
Also, Rust already has an OS project called RedoxOS, so maybe Rustfags need to leave Linux alone and go contribute there. It is MIT licensed though, so it's basically just ripe for any corporation to swoop in and lock up behind a closed license if it ever develops significantly beyond the hobbyist stage. I don't think it will ever attract a large number of contributors due to the license.
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 No.9398

>>9396
I couldn't give a fuck about le SJWs. Linux is already full of contributions from GPL-hostile companies and that didn't change anything.
You can compile Linux with clang, but you can't compile rust with GCC and the based motherfuckers at FSF already recognized this trick and are working on their own GPL compiler. Let's hope they succeed.


File: 1623876014988.png (570.4 KB, 849x550, 1623616859869.png)

 No.9317[Reply]

How does anyone use the APP? I have tried to use that app over and over again and i just can't get adjusted to it.
This isn't a knock on the devs or the hard work they have done or the people who use it. It has done a lot of good and with out the app we very well wpuld have probably been put on a different time line where the forces pf evil and the bunker won out.

That being said, I just don't get it. Aesthetically the app is very jagged and rough on my eyes. When in comparison to just the normal browser view I still get to pick my themes and the themes look like they do on my desktop machine. There's also just the general browsing experience. The browser allows me to judt browse the board as if i was on my desktop, but, the app just feels counter intuitive to the browsing habits of imageboards i have acquired over the years.

Can some one explain to me?
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 No.9377

File: 1623981751598.jpg (831.34 KB, 1080x2340, screenshot.jpg)

>>9317
Catalog mode feels pretty nice to browse the boards

And I think you can change themes in the settings (although they're not the same as the browser)


File: 1617986347648.jpg (406.96 KB, 1280x720, sicp-shota.jpg)

 No.7742[Reply]

Hello there, /tech/ comrades.

I am passing by to let you know that a Matrix chat for /tech/ talk has been created! The chat has been added to the official leftypol community. This chat is meant to serve as a place to talk tech and programming in general.

Come join us! The link is: https://matrix.to/#/#leftylambda:matrix.org?via=matrix.org

This chat will also be hosting an SICP /read/ing group. That is, we will be studying the book "Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs" and helping each other solve the exercises. For those unaware, SICP used to be the introductory textbook for Computer Science classes at MIT back in the day, and remains a cult classic to this day. It can be used as a general introduction to programming, but will also be rewarding for those more experienced.
32 posts and 10 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9358

File: 1623953919041.pdf (94.15 KB, 67x118, automata-via-macros.pdf)

>>9353
Macros are evaluated at compile time. Lisps are known for their awesome macros. You don't get to write any for SICP, but see pic. related for an example.

However, dynamic dispatch is dynamic, you can't do that at compile time. If you knew what kind of data you will have to handle at compile time, you wouldn't need the dynamic dispatch. Fortunately symbols are identical (every time you evaluate 'sicp, you get back the exact same value), therefore they can be trivially and more importantly very quickly and cheaply compared. With a "sufficiently smart compiler" it should be possible to generate very efficient dynamic dispatch. But it will depend on both the Scheme implementation and the code you write. I'm not sure if any actually does it.
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 No.9365

>>9358
Thanks for the pdf, I'll check it out.

What I was thinking of was the fact (with the impl. in the book) that the cost of dynamic dispatch for towers scaled for every operation as the height of the tower grew, which is much worse than the single indirection OOP languages usually have for virtual member functions.

While reading this book, I also thought about the fact that everything is a linked list. Isn't this horribly inefficient compared to classes with contiguous memory, where you can access any member in constant time? Are the lisp's out there smart enough to cope with this?

Don't get me wrong, so far it looks extremely versatile, but the lack of static typing, contiguous data and so on spook me.
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 No.9366

>>9365
Lisp has vectors (which are contiguous). The book's primary goal is not to make you an efficient lisp programmer, rather it is to teach general programming principles via lisp.
I wouldn't judge lisp based on the pedagogical implementations given in sicp.
>>

 No.9367

>>9366
Good to hear, it's just something my C++ autism has been nagging me about throughout
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 No.9368

Btw, we're now done with chap. 2!

Until 2021-06-25:

* 3: Modularity, Objects, and State
** 1: Assignment and Local State
*** 1: Local State Variables
*** 2: The Benefits of Introducing Assignment
*** 3: The Costs of Introducing Assignment


File: 1617882114061.png (638.66 KB, 1600x1200, gnu-linux-black-wallpaper.png)

 No.7700[Reply]

What are your favorite distributions and why?
16 posts and 2 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9259

>>9247
Why don't you?
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 No.9260

File: 1623753876229.png (62.51 KB, 295x273, 1621539959934.png)

>>9258
LM was the first OS I ever used for Linux and if you are openly making declarations of your laziness then I can't fault you. Hell, I use Gentoo on my desktop but i installed Ubuntu on my laptop just out of sheer laziness. Mint is a great Os though and I can't knock you for using it for the sake of laziness.
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 No.9261

Fedora for desktop and Centos for servers.
>>

 No.9264

Debian, because it just werks
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 No.9351

Debian. Works for almost every use case from making old computers still useful to my daily programming work, container shit, server side stuff, etc. and has a massive community that ensures that you have reasonably up-to-date versions of every software within the linux/unix ecosystem.

Also it helps that at least some who use and develop for it still have an ideological inclination towards the FSF and real free software instead of being fronts for corporate shit (Fedora, Ubuntu, etc) or total sellouts like the user-focused ones whose priorities lie more towards being Apple clones in functionality instead of free software.


File: 1621049915255.png (19.62 KB, 1200x630, 1621021893932.png)

 No.8483[Reply]

Another honeypot takes its mask off.
41 posts and 6 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.8759

>>8742
is it better than briar?
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 No.8763

wait what happened?
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 No.9177

>>8742
What are you suspicious about? The concept you just laid out sounds highly solid to me. Paying people to host a node sounds like a wonderful idea in terms of keeping a network uncompromised?
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 No.9182

>>8742
>This network is built around some cryptocoin

ugh no thanks
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 No.9343

https://github.com/LibreSignal/LibreSignal/issues/37#issuecomment-217211165
Remember when Marlinspike got his panties in a bunch over someone making a version of signal that doesn't need google?


File: 1619953310090.jpg (153.29 KB, 640x966, laura-ockel-RoZWxeFL27k-un….jpg)

 No.8216[Reply]

Title gives my conclusion from empirical events I witnessed and inside info. PSP runs on the same circuit, but isn't the backdoor per se, which has been around for much longer.

Just like AMD was able to change the crypto algorithms for the Zen chip they licensed to China, they can change how the CPU behaves at any system, even those already deployed. This can be used to sabotage any program or computation, making BadBIOS (uses radio, not sound) vastly nastier than StuxNet.

American military made a grave mistake by giving access to the morons of the Brazilian military, who are letting knowledge of this spread like a fire (and misusing it for petty profit and inside jobs to justify a police state). Israel, UK and France also have access, but are much more professional.
17 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9313

>>8216
>BadBIOS (uses radio, not sound)
Just don't have a radio mic or speakers?
Whats to stop you from popping open your laptop or cell phone and wireclipping the LTE/speaker cables.
>>

 No.9314

>>8216
honestly who cares if ur not gonna do a crime
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 No.9318

>>9314
well he can't admit to planning one nowadays can he?
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 No.9327

File: 1623919565475.jpeg (128.98 KB, 651x769, knowledge is power.jpeg)

>>9314
>honestly who cares if ur not gonna do a crime
>>9314
well he can't admit to planning one nowadays can he?
it's never been about crime
Knowledge is power, if corporations or other organisations know more about you as you know about them, they have an knowledge advantage over you that lets them politically disenfranchise you. Class societies have a class war going , and the surveillance stuff is them following the doctrine of "know your enemy". Even if you are just a rightist social democrat that wants bourgeois democracy with welfare capitalism, you have to insist on completely removing the state and corporations from personal devices and home networks, or you' won't even be able to have bourgeois democracy.

Even if the proletariat has robust control over the state you would still make personal devices off limits, people store their personal lives in these things and it's almost like violating bodily autonomy if you give powerful organisations access to personal devices. You wouldn't want to be frisked by the police in the offline world even if you have nothing to hide, so it's not ok to do that in the online world.

It's also really stupid for strategical considerations, the NSA or big tech is not securing the access they have to your machines, so even if you are fine with making people corporate serfs without political rights, you would still hand them over to basically moderately tech-able organisations that can buy cyber-break-in tools from the grey market. Basically the backdoors to your computer and communications will become available to your local mafia, eventually, because big organisations leak what ever trick they develop.

For a strong socialist society the reasons are different, people cannot be politically disenfranchised even if you backdoor devices. But it would still compromise your technology and infrastructure. You have no reason to believe that a socialist society would be better at securing "the other end of the backdoor". It makes your society vulnerable to coordination-collapse-attacks. An example of this type of attack was the Soviet block dissolution. The entire economic system relied on the central planning buro for economic coordination and once the neo-liberal coup was able to bPost too long. Click here to view the full text.
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 No.9341

>>9327
GOOD post.


File: 1608525831336.jpeg (5.75 KB, 256x256, t56756756.jpeg)

 No.118[Reply]

I was using riseup.net as a VPN, but, now cloudflair (The upstream provider for the site) is blocking it. Furthermore, it's come to my attention that riseup boofed their canary after the FBI requested server logs. They are glowin the darks, for real, and confirmed.
What VPN would you suggest anon? What VPN, if any, do you use. I was thinking of routing all my traffic over tor, but, currently the site still blocks tor traffic.

Help me out guys, I feel naked, thanks.
65 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9282

>>118
AirVPN, activist devs that are highly competent and have contributed a lot upstream for OpenVPN
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 No.9283

>>9281
Its really not. tl;dr "not all sites need SSL" yes they do. and it can give a false sense of security, which might be a point? but not a good point.
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 No.9290

>>9277
It's free and lots of people use it, so your traffic blends in with the crowd. Riseup is a leftist organization that's more likely to resist subpoenas than commercial VPNs.
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 No.9295

>>9290
How do they finance themselves without selling your data? I mean I'm assuming they don't.
>>

 No.9335

>>9295
Donations. It doesn't cost that much to have an unlimited multi-gigabit connection in a data center these days.


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