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/tech/ - Technology

"Technology reveals the active relation of man to nature" - Karl Marx
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File: 1608526430727.jpeg (14.97 KB, 474x357, le hacker face.jpeg)

 No.6248[Reply]

>US national security agencies issued a joint statement Wednesday acknowledging a "significant and ongoing hacking campaign" that's affecting the federal government. It's still unclear how many agencies are affected or what information hackers might have stolen so far, but by all accounts the malware is extremely powerful. According to analysis by Microsoft and security firm FireEye, both of which were also infected with the malware, it gives hackers broad reach into impacted systems.
>On Thursday, Politico reported that systems at the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration were also affected. Also on Thursday, Microsoft said it had identified more than 40 customers that were targeted in the hack. More information is likely to emerge about the hack and its aftermath.
https://www.cnet.com/news/microsoft-head-calls-solarwinds-hack-act-of-recklessness-what-you-need-to-know/
https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2020/12/microsoft-is-reportedly-added-to-the-growing-list-of-victims-in-solarwinds-hack/

One of the worst parts about mass surveillance is that the people doing it are embarrassingly bad at securing the data they're hoarding.
1 post omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.6276

I honestly don't know if I believe it.

 No.6291

>>6276
The only part that's probably not real is that this was done by le russians.

 No.6293

>>6291
well, there is a good chance that it was. They have a pretty extensive cyber warfare setup.

 No.6297

>>6293
Prove it. Until then, consider who stands to gain by producing an intangible enemy. Also see >>6226

 No.6305

>>6291
Sure thing Ivan



File: 1608526429582.jpeg (37.62 KB, 474x379, itx.jpeg)

 No.6238[Reply]

Do itx mobos without (((wireless))) even exist anymore?
1 post omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.6240

Yes

 No.6241

>>6239
I don't want mandatory wifi/bluetooth on my motherboard.

>>6240
Such as?

 No.6242

>>6241
isnt that shit pretty easy to disable? I dont think niggas are gonna pull up to your house and hack your bluetooth.

 No.6243

>>6241
The ones here that don't say WiFi should be WiFi free https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/AMD-X470-B450

 No.6244

I'd switch to ITX if actually small cases weren't so expensive.



File: 1608526428001-1.png (137.34 KB, 1276x4670, LOC-2015.png)

 No.6226[Reply]

Seven hundred million lines of code written over a period of thirteen years. That's how large the CIA's Marble framework was at the time of its 2017 Wikileaks "Vault7" exposure. At Bill Binney's estimate of $50 per line, that's a $35 billion program.

Ever since learning this I have been attempting to find programs of a similar size. The Linux kernel is currently roughly 27.8 million LOC. Windows Vista was 50 million LOC. Mac OS X v10.4 was 85 million LOC. Supposedly some "high-end" proprietary car software is at the 100 million LOC range. And according to many sources, the entirety of Google internet services is 2 billion lines of codes–but I don't think that really counts because it's hardly a discrete piece of software.

So is the Marble framework one of the largest pieces of software ever created? Is there nothing else that compares?

 No.6230

is LoC really sound metric to use for measuring size of a project? Language like C can really blow up when you attempt to replicate object oriented programming concepts (systemd code base is verbose not bloat IMO). I don't know anything about proprietary car software but if they are one of those real-time control things that needs to be written in assembly or very low level constructs, they will also blow up in terms of LoC.

if there is a way to measure information density of a program by complexity of feature and then combine it with number of features, that will be really cool application of information theory.

 No.6231

>>6230
well OK then I'm just counting number of instructions of binary but there could be a way to measure this in more abstract ways through flow analysis or something



File: 1608526426376.jpg (686.87 KB, 1685x2418, Urias-A-McGill.jpg)

 No.6213[Reply]

Do chemists just mix and heat weird shit together just to see what happens?
1 post omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.6292

Well what would YOU do?

 No.6294

>>6213
well based on their previous understanding of the chemicals and what they're made of, they can infer what the effect will be.

 No.6295

>>6213
A good number of them died trying to isolate chlorine.

 No.6298

>>6213
>Do chemists just mix and heat weird shit together just to see what happens?
they also sometime stick electrodes into flasks and see what happens when they zap something, that's how we got batteries.

 No.6376

>>6213
Most of what goes on in chemistry could be boiled down [spoiler] :^) [/spoiler] to that yes.



File: 1608526419630.jpg (187.37 KB, 717x996, bdh9rut6qe941.jpg)

 No.6155[Reply]

>with the power of ai and machine learning we built this 300% efficient quantum supercomputer to make the world go fully green and STOP climate change by 2025

 No.6156

>>6155
I know people like this. talking to them is pain

 No.6157

Any type of "AI will fix it" talk makes me roll my eyes, really

 No.6158

What will really happen:

 No.6194

>>6158
As someone who got into a job that had machine learning knowledge as a requirement, this is completely true. They had a database of all their phone calls and wanted me to improve an algorithm that tried to determine the mood of the person they called to get to sell them useless trash.



File: 1608526417636.jpg (112.17 KB, 1130x678, singularity.jpg)

 No.6134[Reply]

Is a singularity even plausible? *asking leftists*

Like my personal opinion no. because if we enter a singularity what's to say that we didn't have the intelligence to create our own information I:E if we manage to create bots smarter than us then why would we let them fuck up the world. we would probably use them to teach us what they know and then burn them once we have the information.

humans know bots don't have feelings feeling and consciousness are only experienced by living things bot can only retain information and use that information to make more information then we grab that information. That's what we do now with calculators after all

what do you think?

 No.6135

Well of course it's possible, just not on the near future. A better question is if it is desirable. Also keep in mind humans have a tendency towards self-destruction, just look at what's happened in the latest centuries.

And who's to say a sufficiently intelligent AI can't develop feelings of their own? They'll most probably be completely alien to us, though.

 No.6137

>>6134
If the Singularity means an artificial intelligence that improves it self faster and faster, that is not possible, because it violates the law of diminishing returns. If it just means that humanity could build vast artificial intelligences that run most of society like in the Ian Banks Culture novels that is possible.



File: 1608526417253.png (419.43 KB, 1571x831, 1607539627347.png)

 No.6131[Reply]

Solve the verification problem before it's too late and it's enforced because "who will think of whomever the fuck". Time is running out.
All those takedowns really made the anti-privacy goons come out. "Just give them your ID", "it's necessary for the whatever", "what do You have to whatever".
Also I don't care about porn but it's the only picture I found that fits.

 No.6136

The development of neural networks and its consequences have been a disaster for the internet.

 No.6139

>>6131
lol
porn will be over saturated by deepfakes, GANs, and AI.
Textual porn is already fucked thanks to GST3 and other bots.

Saturate it all imo



File: 1608526416858.jpeg (8.27 KB, 290x174, images (24).jpeg)

 No.6127[Reply]

For a site known predominantly for leftism and marxists ideology I was expecting more threads on factories and better methods of mass producing state demanded goods on its tech board. Oh well, stay in school and work hard y'all
4 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.6138

I always like hardware manufacturing over software.

Whenever I've visited mills or shops, even once a real industrial smelter and forge, the machines and ambience were amazing. Some of this tech runs well even though it's over 100 years old.

Recently I visited an old 19th century factory that had been converted into a fabricator centre with 3D printing and CNC milling

>mfw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gIMZ0WyY88

 No.6142

>>6132
You can't 3d print steel you need to mold or shape it into useable machinery dipshit!!

 No.6167

>>6142
3D print metal microparticles and then put it in a kiln.
nothin personnel kiddo

 No.6283

>>6167
Apparently there's an Australian one that does it by blasting the stuff out so fast it welds on contact.

 No.6306

>>6283
source ?
how do they deal with oxide layers ?



File: 1608526411784.jpg (204.67 KB, 1920x1290, 3ils011k0fj31.jpg)

 No.6074[Reply]

Goodbye vim, you have treated me well. We emacs now. Post emacs/comfy memes
39 posts and 5 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.7529

>>7527
Emacs is a hacked together abomination but it's still the best text editor and operating system in existence.
The next Emacs release should be much faster because it will be GTK native and GCCEmacs will be merged.
But you are not totally wrong. Eventually, Emacs will either need a revolutionary overhaul that will force a total rewrite of several essential functions in order to become multithreaded OR it will need to be retired in favor of a new editor that is built for the 21st century. All of the fine tuned optimizations we are seeing at the Elisp level are trying to delay the inevitable.

 No.7561

Depends on what I'm writing. If it's something really short I use nano, if I'm writing something longer in C I'll use emacs.
I do some math stuff so I use python a lot, and I've recently found Spyder which makes my life much easier and is actually fun, though it makes my shitty laptop have a heart attack whenever I open it.

 No.7563

>>7561
>spyder
Use google colab notebooks for python. You can do it all online, might help your computer performance

 No.7585

>>7527
It seems to be a healthy project to me. Emacs is still getting plenty of bugfixes and some new features. By software standards it is ancient, and it does have a lot of baggage because of it, but I did not see any signs of it falling apart, at least as an outsider. I don't follow the development mailing list itself, only the emacs-news, so I might have missed the warning signs.

Emacs can do a lot that would surprise you. With pdf-tools it can display PDF files pretty much as good as a standalone PDF viewer: https://github.com/politza/pdf-tools There's a real-time video game written in it: https://github.com/fitzsim/slime-volleyball

 No.7602

>>7563
I actually went from using notebooks to using Spyder, though I still use notebooks for some things, usually writing the code in spyder and then moving it to a notebook.

The only reason I'd use colab is because as far as I understand you run the code on google's servers rather than the laptop, but I actually have some access to a cluster anyway.



 No.6055[Reply]

https://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/eu-wants-iphones-replaceable-batteries-at-what-cost/

>A Dutch financial newspaper reports the European Union (EU) wants to establish a new regulation that would “force electronics manufacturers to facilitate easier battery replacements.”


>It’s been years since flagship phones and laptops came with easily removable batteries, especially from companies like Apple. Have tech companies pulled the wool over our eyes? Or do people not care as much about removable batteries as the EU thinks?


>If you buy a phone today, chances are you can’t easily remove the battery yourself. If you really want to try it out, it’ll require dozens of steps, including the removal of delicate pieces like the screen and the logic board. It’s not for the faint of heart.


>I took a poll, asking people if an easily replaceable battery was a major factor when buying a phone. Unsurprisingly, the overwhelming majority wouldn’t buy a phone just for a replaceable battery.


>Maybe we’ve all fallen for Apple’s marketing schemes. Maybe we could’ve had super-thin, sturdy phones with replaceable batteries all along. We believed the explanation that Apple provided because its phones thin and waterproof, and that’s what we wanted at the time.


Hopefully this applies to laptops too.
18 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.6415

>>6069
yer on the wrong board

 No.7396

>>6060
>EU is the only defense against Big Tech short of actually overthrowing capitalism.
They only do this sort of stuff because the US has the monopoly on tech and its a way to rival them. Its just inter-porky infighting and is naive to praise one side

Also most of their regulations comes with the increased dependance on EU products that can comply with them

 No.7640

>>6055
>Unsurprisingly, the overwhelming majority wouldn’t buy a phone just for a replaceable battery.
I would. The last two phones I've owned died because they gradually stopped being able to hold a charge.

 No.7841

File: 1618502719828.png (310.86 KB, 631x862, EU.png)

https://www.theverge.com/2021/4/14/22383301/eu-ai-regulation-draft-leak-surveillance-social-credit

>The European Union is considering banning the use of artificial intelligence for a number of purposes, including mass surveillance and social credit scores. This is according to a leaked proposal that is circulating online, first reported by Politico, ahead of an official announcement expected next week.


>If the draft proposal is adopted, it would see the EU take a strong stance on certain applications of AI, setting it apart from the US and China. Some use cases would be policed in a manner similar to the EU’s regulation of digital privacy under GDPR legislation.

 No.7849

>>7841
Holy based.



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