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 No.4317[Reply]

/edu/ what are some resources that you've used or know of to help newbies learn to organise?

Obviously "Just join local X to get experience", but just doing prior reading.

MLs, Anarkiddies, Syndies, etc. All sources and styles welcome.

Just trying to build a little portfolio to read and share.
1 post omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.4319


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 No.4323

File: 1608528383033.png (222.65 KB, 500x375, a cute.png)




 No.4281[Reply]

Anyone know of good books on leadership as an academic field? Analyses of different styles and structures of leadership are welcome as well. None of that self-help, entrepreneurial, hero worship, or landfill literature BS that so often dominates pop culture. Thanks friends.

 No.4282

https://www.psychology.org.au/inpsych/2017/august/power
Check the citations for this article to begin with

 No.4287

Lars T. Lih's Lenin Rediscovered: What Is to Be Done? In Context comes to mind. It's a massive, 880 page tome that includes a new translation of what is probably Lenin's "most misunderstood revolutionary text"

 No.4314

>>4287
>"most misunderstood revolutionary text"
How so?

 No.4328


 No.4459

>>4287
>Lars T. Lih
aint he a trotskyeet



 No.4254[Reply]

It seems like most socialists are either Marxists who support comprehensive state planning, or anarchists who support either cooperative firms or informal local economies.

Isn't this a false dichotomy, though? Different institutions have different strengths and weaknesses. Non-centralized institutions are necessary to deal with major collective action problems, like for instance climate change, but can come with a small number of failure points. One could imagine a world where SOEs produce public goods and homogenous commodities at scale, while smaller cooperatives form to produce more differentiated or experimental products.

I suppose a difficulty this introduces is that unlike everyone both owning and working for the state, or everyone both owning and working for their cooperative, this produces a seeming worker-owner split, with everyone owning the state but only some working for it. But there might presumably be a way to fix this with the way the state funds new cooperatives and collects back surplus from successful ones, which would seem to be necessary to avoid independent capital accumulation in an economy of just cooperatives anyway; and there may be aspects of the labor/ownership split that are physically inevitable per Critique of the Gotha Program (it cannot ever be the case that the only people who benefit from labor are the laborers, etc.)

Probably people have already done the math on this, or shown ways you could do it or why you couldn't, but I'm an ignoramus, so I'm posting this here.

 No.4270

I agree with your overall point, that we're not dealing with two absolutes, you either centrally plan everything or you decentralise everything. The world we are inheriting, or will inherit, will come with issues and conditions that can only be solved by something that acts as a state apparatus.
>Non-centralized institutions are necessary to deal with major collective action problems, like for instance climate change
Funny, because I'd actually say that climate change is something that needs a central/unified/planned solution, rather than a bunch of decentralised solutions that would probably be counter-productive more often than not.

Things we need central planning/state apparatus to deal with:
>climate change
>nuclear arsenal
>nuclear energy and accompanying infrastructure
>medical science and healthcare
>defense on a "national"/regional scale
>maintenance of ecosystems, land, fisheries, oceans, etc.
>standardisation of things like electrical appliances, and anything else that needs to interwork with other part
>standardisation of education (to some degree, to make sure everyone is sort of on the same level)
Other than that, everything can be decided on a local scale, by community councils or assemblies, or whatever, similar to how the Zapatistas make decisions and run their region.

The idea is that every autonomous region (to call it that) would be largely self-sufficient when it comes to things like food, water, shelter, education, and the basic necessities, while the rest would be made in cooperation with the other regions. Or that's how the whole libertarian marxism, libertarian communism thing sounds like to me.

 No.4276

>>4270
>Funny, because I'd actually say that climate change is something that needs a central/unified/planned solution
That's actually just me being a dumbass - I meant to list climate change as something that required a centralized solution!



 No.4251[Reply]

I haven't read much but I'm confused as to why Marx and others conceived of the proletariat as the class that would overthrow capitalism. If we look at history through a materialist lense it seems to me that it's only been a third propertied class overthrows the current system of production, not the people without property. For example, it wasn't slaves that overthrew slavery, it was landlords. It wasn't serfs that overthrew feudalism, it was the bourgeoisie. Every revolution calling itself socialist that actually took state power was led by petit-bourgeois intellectuals like Lenin, Ho Chi Minh, Mao, and Fidel Castro and manned mostly not by workers, but by peasants in a semi-colonial semi-feudal relationship to the means of production. Most proletarian movements in advanced capitalist societies have been reformist and class collaborationist. How, after all of this evidence, can we say that the proletariat is the revolutionary class? How can you say the workers have nothing to lose but their chains when they need capitalism to keep going so they can have running water, electricity, and the spectacle to keep them comfortable?
17 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.4272

in both examples provided, classes were sediment and predetermined. this allows for middle classes that can flourish and help the workers because they had a common enemy. In capitalism, however, the middle classes are dissolving into either the proletarian or the bourgeoisie. This class organization means that the proletarian will become the ONLY class with revolutionary potential because, eventually, they will be the only non possessing class. for now though, there is some weak solidarity with some petit bourgeoisie so we should take advantage of that as much as we can at least. hope this helped comrade ! :)

 No.4273

>>4272
>they will be the only non possessing class
a non possessing class has never been able to overthrow a class system. Again, who overthrew slavery? It wasn't the slaves. Assuming a non possessing class will overthrow our current class system is a break from all historical trends.

 No.4274

well i am not sure how things will play out, but my point was that the proletarian may have to break that cycle out of necessity. however i dont think we should ignore our petite comrades that, with out the influence of the proletariat, would surley not revolt

 No.4275

>>4274
>but my point was that the proletarian may have to break that cycle out of necessity
just because something is necessary doesn't meant it will happen, remember Marx is not a determinist, he noted that not just proletarian revolution is possible, but that the "common ruin of the contending classes" is just as much a possibility, and if the climate alarmists are correct, this is the where we already are and basically the course change would come too late to matter.

 No.4286

>>4251
The capitalist mode of production is increasingly powerless. In the pursuit of profit, it is stuck in maintaining the infrastructure of society. Infrastructure maintenance is an unprofitable or low-profitable business. But without infrastructure, society cannot function. Only the proletariat, who do not work for profit, can lead the whole society from the inevitable collapse caused by capitalism.



 No.4227[Reply]

I've heard the May '68 failure characterized as being due to a conflict between the PCF and the students themselves. I haven't finished reading PDF related (below) but so far it seems to support this, being from the perspective of the students and, as you would expect, laying the blame on the PCF as well as heaping them with epithets (comparing them to liberals, for example). So my questions here are:

&lt1. Is this book known to anyone? If not, does it look like a decent primary source from the students' point of view?
&lt2. Does anyone have anything more sympathetic to the PCF that could balance it out? Or even something more neutral to both sides?

Thx anons

 No.4236

The PCF and CGT told the wildcat strikers to go back to work because they thought they would win the election, they sabotaged the whole thing for their own bourgeois political gain only to be BTFOd by Gualle in the actual elections. You can't balance out betrayal.

 No.4277

OP here, sorry that I never posted the file. I forgot TOR users can't post files. The book is Worker-Student Action Committees by Gregoire and Perlman, probably can be found on Google.

>>4236
I didn't clarify that I wasn't implying the PCF couldn't be in the wrong. Do you have a good book on it? Do you think the book I mentioned is good? It's short af so I'll probably just read it anyway.



 No.4197[Reply]

I'm a history major in Burgerstan, I'm hoping to really focus in on labor history and eventually get some kind of law degree so I can help Unions or work for OSHA or some shit. I thought it might be a good idea to start reading up on one of the more violent episodes of American Capitalism. Can anybody recommend some good accounts or Historians that cover the Coalfield Wars?

 No.4209

I know a few books but I gotta wait until I can go back to the library to find the titles.

 No.4288

Robert Ovetz's When Workers Shot Back: Class Conflict from 1877 to 1921 would probably be a good starting point. 606 pages; it has a section on the West Virginia coal wars.

 No.4290

Nigga if you are a history major you should be recommending books to us



File: 1608528369483.jpeg (86.59 KB, 1949x1096, 1.jpeg)

 No.4153[Reply]

If ML anti-revisionism came to encompass a defense of orthodox Marxism, Bolshevism/Leninism and Stalinism, then:
1. what features did the ML revisionism of Khrushchev and his USSR followers entail that broke with this
2. which policies differentiated Dengist revisionism from the USSR revisionism, enough for them to not be able to get along by Brezhnev-Deng times?
3. Does Bukharin'ism' play any particular role in how these right-wing deviations differed?

 No.4181

post this on leftypol maybe someone will answer fuck the mods



File: 1608528326360.jpg (123.05 KB, 367x648, peopleshistory_audio.jpg)

 No.3703[Reply]

Any historical books similar to this?
10 posts and 3 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.10880

>>10876
>>10875
>>10874
Fuck off, reactionary scum. This is OUR secret CeePee-sharing thread!

 No.10884

File: 1654395375657.mp4 (416.09 KB, 480x480, dragonball_Z.mp4)

I love little kids (4~8max), but when I see lovely big uyghur cock I have to think twice before choosing.

 No.10894

File: 1654395495912.mp4 (392.01 KB, 320x320, cartheft.mp4)

Children can consent. I know you know it too.

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 No.10928

Thanks for the tips, comrades.



File: 1608528368411.jpg (62.68 KB, 465x640, voroshilovbudyonny.jpg)

 No.4140[Reply]

Anyone have any recommended books on the Russian Civil War? Preferably from a military focus and perspective from the Soviet side.

 No.4141

Bumping this as I'd like to know too.

 No.4142

I had some but I've forgotten the names and i' can't be arsed to look through my bookshelves.

 No.4143

>>4142
If I spot any I'll let you know though… they're mostly in Russian however



File: 1608528366727.jpg (116.64 KB, 555x414, Theodore_Kaczynski.jpg)

 No.4123[Reply]

Explain, in your opinion, from a Marxist standpoint, which held the more important change to humanity's social organization, technology, and relationship to Nature; was it the Agricultural Revolution with the start of animal husbandry, settlements, and war? Was it the Urban Revolution with the start of social classes, states, philosophical inquiry, and writing? Or was it the Industrial Revolution with the start of modern warfare, modern agricultural, globalization, modern science, and the population boom?

 No.4125

>>4123
within marxism itself there is a distinct early modern agricultural revolution which drove the birth of capitalism in the 16th and 17th centuries by what became the earliest capitalists, farmers. the technological early modern agricultural revolution led to the creation of the wage laborer in the 18th century and these are the laborers that went on to be the primary commodity in the industrial revolution.

from a marxist standpoint, i think its clear that the industrial revolution led to the single most increase productive ability in humanity, and therefore has the single most impact (good and bad) on our history and society

 No.4128

>>4125
Hmmm, I guess honestly this makes sense. It wasn't until the Industrial Revolution that mankind even had a collective expectation of constant technological and social progress, before humans assumed all was static, they didn't even realize that there was a time before classes and even agriculture. It wasn't until the Industrial Revolution that mankind believed that an existence away from their world was not only POSSIBLE but even INEVITABLE



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