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 No.4908[Reply]

how big is the skill gap between genre fiction and literary fiction? are there genre fiction writers who are equally as good as literary fiction authors?
4 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.5092

Whats the difference? Asking as a brainlet

 No.5094

>>5092
Literary Fiction is designed to be more inventive in its style and use of language and maybe use a lot more big literary words, Genre fiction is more like lowest common denominator stuff like generic Sci-Fi, Fantasy, and Romance.

 No.5102

>>5094
What about Tolkien and other sci-fi giants like Herbert, Asimov, Arthur Clarke, or William Gibson? I wouldn't consider them lowest common denominator, and they seem pretty well respected.

 No.5103

>>4971
Yes but it's still genre fiction in the end
>>5092
Genre implies that something is expected, the most concise example of this is comedy, when you go to something that is supposed to be a comedy you expect it to be funny but what's funny changes according to culture and era but the genre label of comedy persists because that's the label for this specific thing.
Literary fiction is a recent term to hold all fiction that doesn't really fall into a genre but most people that go for it expects it to be fiction written for art's sake.
You can have sci fi that is well written and really deep but in the end it's still sci fi and your attempt to make it more literary will only alienate either audience.

 No.5160

>>4908
Genre follows a given formula, which tends to make it less intellectual. There is, however, an art to the crafting of even formulaic works, the formula itself being an artistic subject. Genre writers have, on occasion, developed literary devices that later writers have found useful like Ian Fleming's "Fleming Sweep" or Elmore Leonard's rule: "If it looks like writing, I rewrite it." Elmore Leonard in particular was often refered to as the genre writer who serious writers take seriously.



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 No.4881[Reply]

25 posts and 23 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.6203

>>4882
Where the hell is volume 38 in that Lenin magnet???

 No.6204

>tfw so much based content itt but your toaster is full

JUST

 No.6223

>>4889
>Yi Yi?
Hardy left wing, mostly about how that Japanese guy had good business ethics and fucking him over was bad. Platform is a better Asian movie on the topic of communism and Chinese relations
Also seed itanarcho-nihilismAnarcho-Nihilism

 No.6224


 No.6226

>>6204
it's bullshit that people say when they say that storage is cheap



 No.4871[Reply]

Is this book worthy of reading?thinkThink

 No.4872

Read it and find out!

 No.4878

>>4871
Marxist economist Michael Robert has reviewed the book
>"Suffice it to say that, although Piketty repeats the title of Marx’s book, published exactly 150 years ago, he dismisses Marx’s analysis of capitalism based on the law of value and the tendency of the rate of profit to fall and adopts the mainstream theories of marginal productivity and/or market ‘imperfections’ like ‘rent-seeking’. This leads to the view that capitalism could be ‘reformed’ and inequality reduced by such measures as a global financial tax or progressive inheritance taxes or more recently a universal basic income (Piketty is now advising French socialist presidential candidate Hamon on this now)."

Roberts say that Capital in the 21st Century is more of a rejection of Marxism than an update of it. Here's some links to blogposts about the book. Read these and then decide if its worth your time.
https://thenextrecession.wordpress.com/2019/10/18/capital-not-ideology/
https://thenextrecession.wordpress.com/2017/02/19/inequality-after-150-years-of-capital/
https://thenextrecession.wordpress.com/2014/04/28/reviewing-piketty-again/



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 No.4863[Reply]

How can we reconcile these two seemingly contradictory passages of Marx's? Are they even contradictory?

From Critique of the Gotha Program:
>Within the co-operative society based on common ownership of the means of production, the producers do not exchange their products; just as little does the labor employed on the products appear here as the value of these products, as a material quality possessed by them, since now, in contrast to capitalist society, individual labor no longer exists in an indirect fashion but directly as a component part of total labor. The phrase "proceeds of labor", objectionable also today on account of its ambiguity, thus loses all meaning.

From Capital Vol III:
>Secondly, after the abolition of the capitalist mode of production, but still retaining social production, the determination of value continues to prevail in the sense that the regulation of labour-time and the distribution of social labour among the various production groups, ultimately the book-keeping encompassing all this, become more essential than ever.

Similarly, does Engels contradict Marx's above passage in Capital in his letter to Karl Kautsky on the 20th of September, 1884?
>Present value is that of the production of commodities, but with the suppression of the production of commodities, value 'changes' or rather, value as such remains and merely changes its form. But in fact economic value is a category that appertains to the production of commodities, disappearing with it, just as it did not exist before it. The relation of labour to product prior to and after production of commodities no longer expresses itself in the form of value.

 No.4864

>>4863
>the determination of value continues to prevail in the sense that the regulation of labour-time and the distribution of social labour among the various production groups, ultimately the book-keeping encompassing all this, become more essential than ever.
this is not commodity exchange

>the producers do not exchange their products

he's referring to commodity exchange

>just as little does the labor employed on the products appear here as the value of these products, as a material quality possessed by them, since now, in contrast to capitalist society, individual labor no longer exists in an indirect fashion but directly as a component part of total labor. The phrase "proceeds of labor", objectionable also today on account of its ambiguity, thus loses all meaning.

he means labor prices don't appear as something inherent in products the way that value is inherent in commodities, but instead, as something transparently socially agreed upon and determined through somewhat arbitrary social accounting methods

 No.4865

>>4864
So were both Marx and Engels asserting that the law of value does not exist under the lower stage of communism, following the abolition of commodity production?



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 No.4837[Reply]

Any parents here? Please recommend books for 7-14yo kids that aren't lib shit (i.e. most of the Amazon top and NYT bestsellers).

Not explicitly leftist, just some fiction and non-fiction that isn't based in liberal worldview like picrelated.
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 No.4906

>>4837
kids that age should be reading dystopian fiction and pulp fiction i.e. Huxley, Orwell, Sherlock Holmes, HP Lovecraft

 No.4907

>>4854
seconding Isaac Asimov

 No.4919

>>4859
You could watch the movie. It's dazzling trash.
I'll tl;dr:

First part of the story is Pi being all "omg, does god exist, does it not????" meeting with absolute retards to discuss this matter. A big revealing moment is when Pi goes to the zoo and sees "the worlds most dangerous animal", and it's a mirror, ie humans.

Second part of the book, Pi has a fantastic journey stranded in the Ocean with animals. There's a lion too. The lion is dangerous and eats animals Pi likes.

Third part of the book: Pi is rescued and it is revealed that the animals were actually humans, but Pi needed to COPE and made them animals. The description of what actually went down is extremely vulgar and disgusting.

The final kicker and "ah-ha!" insight moment is when the audience is asked if they prefer the better story (the one with animals and the lion in the middle of the ocean), or the real story (that the animals represented real humans, and the lion was a cook that was insane). The analogy is that "the better story" is pledging fealty to pedophiliac bloodthirsty reactionary religion while "the real story" is atheism, which we are supposed to think as viscerally disgusting (the worst animal is the human, and the insane cannibalistic cook's actions are basically atheism).

When I read it in highscool, there were a bunch of people who said they preferred "the better story". I was a staunch atheist back then. I saw that as an extremely grotesque acceptance that their belief in religion is literally COPE because they would rather not believe in "the real story". For a moment, I was considering the possibility that the book was written by an atheist to expose the religious as retards through 1D chess. But after a lot of classmates chose "the better story" and after analysis I realized it was filled with retarded arguments "supporting" atheism in the first part, I realized it was a retarded COPE of the highest caliber. I was an idiot back then, I can only imagine what other bullshit I'd find if I read it today.

 No.4969

>>4919
>First part of the story is Pi being all "omg, does god exist, does it not????"
His final conclusion about this was some nonsense about simultaneously following Hinduism Islam and Christianity.

 No.5047

For nonfiction there is Talking to My Daughter About the Economy by Yanis Varoufakis. Good read for teens about, well, the economy.



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 No.4823[Reply]

I'm a history major and the bourgeois dominance of the field is just as prevalent here as anywhere else.

What books on Marxist conceptions of history, historiography, etc are there that can give me the tools to critique and fight back against bourgeois historians.

 No.4824


 No.4826

Also Anti-Duhring deals with marxist conception of science and world in general. The work is a critique of some guy, but also Engels in it explains historical materialist way of looking at things. The part that were of value on their own were later published in two separate works, Socialism: Utopian and Scientific, and Origins of the Family. I have not read the second one, but I heard that it is based on obsolete anthropology. Personally, I think Anti-Duhring itself is worth reading, but it is the longest.

https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1877/anti-duhring/
https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1880/soc-utop/index.htm
https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1884/origin-family/
And audiobooks of all 3 of them if you want https://listenleft.org/by-author/engels-frederick/

 No.4827

>>4823
Hobsbawm's 4 Ages books are always worth a read as well, imo. If you're a history major you might not really learn anything new as he's more geared toward a slightly-above-layman level of presumed knowledge, but his Marxist (although never really explicitly ML) perspective is prevalent, unapologetic and rigorously researched.

 No.4840

>>4823
Jairus Banaji's Theory as History



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 No.4818[Reply]

I'm starting to learn Portuguese, because I'm tired of being an undereducated burger who relies on English news sources for interaction with the rest of the hemisphere. I would like to eventually learn Spanish and French as well. What can I do to retain the language as best I can, while expanding my knowledge as quickly as I can? Pic
hopefully unrelatedd.read_a_fucking_bookRead a Fucking Book

 No.4819

>>4818
An anon explained a bit about second language acquisition at >>4300

 No.4820

>>4819
Nice. Thanks, anon.read_a_fucking_bookRead a Fucking Book



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 No.4817[Reply]

I need someone to give me a rundown of how does society develop from the end of tribal society up to birth of feudal one.What are the conditions that lead to creation of slave society and lead to its demise? What contradictions are at play here?

My understanding is that first large scale agriculture and with it city states are established. You get social stratification into commoners, nobility and priests. Why does this happen? Do priests and nobles start as mere bureaucrats, organizing production and distribution of food, and over the time solidify their position on top of society?

I am also not quite clear on the reasons why do these city states proceeds to enslave their neighbours. Is because work, particularly farming, sucks and nobody wants to do it, so the citizens of the city state get slaves for it, and thus the main antagonism is between free citizens and slaves? From what I remember from history, the most important class conflicts in Athens were between rising merchant class and nobility, and in Rome between nobility and plebeians.

Ancient city states were oligarchies, but when they expand and become empires, the power seems to concentrate in a hands of single ruler. Why? Also, why does the similar thing happen in feudal kingdoms? In early middle ages, nobility had substantial independence from king, yet during late middle ages came absolutism.

At the end, when Roman empire collapsed, why did the newly settled tribes establish feudal relations between nobility and peasantry, rather that slave society?


 No.4802[Reply]

Hello all. I just finished reading a report about the Israel/Lebanon war called "We Were Caught Unprepared" and I was interested in learning more about Effects-Based Operations and Systemic Operational Design which were used by Israel and written or spread by S. Naveh. It sounds like pomo warfare but I want to know if it's legit or not. I'm trying to find more info about it and the document mentioned here in the report:

>Of the 170 pages long doctrine document, many experienced officers didn’t understand more than half. Officers responsible for planning EBOs in the Air Force, could not understand the definition of EBO (more precisely in Hebrew Effect-Based Campaigns) or of the definition of the word “Campaign” in the document. The terminology used was too complicated, vain, and could not be understood by the thousands of officers that needed to carry it out. . . . The new terminology and methodology was supposed to be limited to the higher levels of command, and at the level of theater command and definitely at the division level, the old terminology and methodology should have been used.


I've found several papers on EBO but nothing penned by Naveh (I'm attaching them). ITT we can also academically discuss military doctrines. I'm more versed in philosophy than military doctrine but I'm open to learning about campaigns or strategies.


 No.4796[Reply]

The goal of LLCO is not to get rid of leadership, or simply to declare everyone a leader by fiat, but rather to make everyone capable of truly being a leader.

 No.4800

a cult with no followers

 No.4807


 No.4821


 No.4822




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